San Diego's Nobel Prize Winners

Over the years, a lot of San Diegans have brought home a Nobel Prize. Here’s the list of our laureates (grouped by institution affiliation), along with the years and fields for which they won.

Salk Institute

David Baltimore: 1938, physiology/medicine, “for discoveries concerning the interaction between tumor viruses and the genetic material of the cell”

J. Michael Bishop: 1989, physiology/medicine, “for their discovery of the cellular origin of retroviral oncogenes”

Sydney Brenner: 2002, physiology/medicine, “for their discoveries concerning genetic regulation of organ development and programmed cell death”

Francis Crick: 1962, physiology/medicine, “for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material”

Renato Dulbecco: 1972, physiology/medicine, “for their discoveries concerning the interaction between tumor viruses and the genetic material of the cell”

Roger Guillemin: 1977, physiology/medicine, “for their discoveries concerning the peptide hormone production of the brain”

Robert Holley: 1968, physiology/medicine, “for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis”

Aaron Klug: 1982, chemistry, “for his development of crystallographic electron microscopy and his structural elucidation of biologically important nucleic acid-protein complexes”

The Neurosciences Institute

Gerald Edelman: 1972, physiology/medicine, “for discoveries concerning the chemical structure of antibodies”

Scripps Research Institute

K. Barry Sharpless: 2001, chemistry, “for his work on chirally catalysed oxidation reactions”

UCSD

Hannes Alfvén: 1970, physics, "for fundamental work and discoveries in magneto-hydrodynamics with fruitful applications in different parts of plasma physics"

Paul Crutzen: 1995, chemistry, “for work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone”

Robert Engle III: 2003, economics, "for methods of analyzing economic time series with time-varying volatility (ARCH)"

Maria Goeppert-Mayer: 1963, physics, “for discoveries concerning nuclear shell structure”

Clive W.J. Granger: 2003, economics, "for methods of analyzing economic time series with common trends (cointegration)"

Harry Markowitz: 1990, economics, for pioneering work in the theory of financial economics

Mario Molina: 1995, chemistry, “for work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone”

Kary Mullis: 1993, chemistry, “for his invention of the polymerase chain reaction method” “for contributions to the developments of methods within DNA-based chemistry”

George Emile Palade: 1974, medicine, “for their discoveries concerning the structural and functional organization of the cell”

Kurt Wüthrich: 2002, chemistry, "for his development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the three-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules in solution"

Harold Urey: 1934, chemistry, “for his discovery of heavy hydrogen”

Edit Module

Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit Module