Diversity and Division



Published:

As San Diego moves into the 21st century, and the racial and ethnic mix of our populace grows more complex, our ability to work, play and succeed together becomes a matter of increasing urgency. That is why San Diego Magazine has spent more than a year researching and writing this three-part series on race and ethnic relations.

More than any other city, perhaps, San Diego represents the melting pot that is supposed to be America. We are a region of Anglos, Latinos, African-Americans, Asian-Americans (of myriad origins), native Americans, Pacific Islanders and many others. The goal of the series is to provide some historical perspective, present a snapshot of where we are and promote a serious and lasting dialogue that may lead to some answers about the future of race and ethnic relations here.

To prepare for this series, San Diego Magazine held a series of roundtable discussions among community leaders and citizens with widely differing views on race. Our team of more than a dozen reporters and editors spent countless hours on research and in one-on-one interviews to bring readers the three main features and 17 sidebar stories in the series. The magazine also commissioned one of the most comprehensive surveys of its kind here, conducted by Viewpoint America. The result is a free-ranging look at race and ethnicity in this dynamic region—an eye-opening view of our history, current challenges and the possibilities for tomorrow.

—Editor

Part II

Reading, Writing and Race in San Diego Schools
San Diego County’s 603 schools are under pressure to make sure all students have equal access to educational opportunities. What are the realities for students of color?

Global High
San Diego’s Crawford High School is a micro-universe of color and cultures. Pulitzer Prize–winning author Jonathan Freedman has an inside look at how it’s working.

From the Trenches
Teachers speak out about the challenges of race and culture in their classrooms and whether standardized tests are fair to minorities.

Resegregation?
Superintendent Alan Bersin says the good news of Proposition MM’s additional schools may be bad news for integration.

Teaching the Parents
Private-sector organizations step in with help to encourage parents’ involvement in their children’s education.

The Word Wall
Bilingual education may not be legally required anymore, but many schools in San Diego have figured out how to offer it.

Anytown
Kids learn lessons on interracial relations at a camp where race and culture are an eye-opening experience.

Next Month, Part III

It’s About the Money: The chance to make a living as they choose—with equal opportunity—is foremost in the minds of people of color. Indeed, some regard the future as more a matter of economics than race. Yet they continue to find roadblocks to jobs, to entrepreneurial opportunities—despite decades of enabling legislation and political promises. San Diego’s economy grows increasingly dependent on a population that grows ever more diverse. Will the region’s business and industry open its doors to all San Diegans? Or will it close the door on its own future?

Margie Craig Farnsworth

Margie Craig Farnsworth is a freelance writer and public relations professional who has lived in San Diego since 1974, when she joined the staff of the San Diego Evening Tribune. She was the newspaper’s education writer from 1975 to 1979, reporting extensively on the court-ordered desegregation of the San Diego city schools. Farnsworth joined Pacific Southwest Airlines in public relations in 1981 and remained there until 1987. Since 1987, she has operated a public relations agency and contributed articles to several magazines, including San Diego Magazine. She also is editor of Prevention File magazine, a national publication for alcohol- and drug-recovery research.

Jonathan Freedman

Jonathan Freedman is a journalist, author and writing mentor. He began his career as a reporter for the Associated Press in Brazil and won a Pulitzer Prize in 1987 for a series of San Diego Tribune editorials about immigration reform. Since 1973, Freedman has been a reporter, editorial writer, columnist and freelance writer for numerous publications, including The New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times and San Diego Magazine. His books include From Cradle to Grave: The Human Face of Poverty in America and Wall of Fame. His essay for this series, “Global High,” grew out of his experience as a writing mentor at San Diego’s Crawford High School.

Neil Kendricks

Neil Kendricks is a San Diego– based artist, photographer, writer and filmmaker. His freelance writing has appeared in publications that include Artweek, Speak, The San Diego Union-Tribune and KPBS On Air. Kendricks’ artwork and photography have been exhibited at the San Diego Museum of Art, the African-American Museum of Fine Arts and London’s Royal College of Art. Recently, Kendricks returned to his studies as a graduate student in television, film and new media at San Diego State University, where he is involved in several film projects.

Cathy Clark

Cathy Clark has more than 30 years of experience in San Diego media as a TV reporter and anchorwoman, newspaper reporter and magazine writer. She has worked in television at KFMB, KNSD and KUSI and was a reporter for the San Diego Tribune. She recently joined the editorial staff of San Diego Magazine and served as project manager for the magazine’s three-part series on race and ethnic relations.

More »Related Stories

The Baja Moment

In eight short years, Baja’s gone from a virtual dead zone to one of the globe’s top food and drink destinations. Now what?

Homebrewing in San Diego

San Diego’s homebrewers are thriving, working hand-in-hand with the city’s powerhouse breweries

Wake Up And Smell the Coffee

As American coffee culture moves past the nonfat vanilla lattes toward a more elevated brew, San Diego is right on trend

Most Popular

  1. Secret San Diego
    Psst! You didn’t hear it from us, but this town has all kinds of "hidden gems" (yes, we said it). And we’re not talking ghost stories at the Hotel Del.
  2. FIRST LOOK: Bottega Americano
    With Bottega Americano opening this weekend, Downtown gets its first gourmet food hall
  3. FIRST LOOK: Fairweather
    Anthony Schmidt tackles "sunny" vacation drinks at Downtown's new patio bar
  4. INCOMING: Duke's
    Iconic Top of the Cove restaurant location gets new life
  5. Wake Up And Smell the Coffee
    As American coffee culture moves past the nonfat vanilla lattes toward a more elevated brew, San Diego is right on trend
  6. THE DEBATE: Minimum Wage and Tips
    San Diego restaurant owner explains what's so awful about raising minimum wage for tipped servers already making double the state minimum (and more).

Promotions

Best of Ensenada 2013

Where to eat, drink, sleep & play

Hawaii: Island Fresh

A handy guide to Hawaii's farmers markets

Connect With Us: