Edit ModuleShow Tags

Front Pages


Published:

(page 1 of 3)

Restyling Racial Profiling

The conversations can’t be comfortable, and are somewhat akin to the story of the blind men trying to describe an elephant. Picture police officers and diversity advocates from around the state sitting in a room, trying to hammer out anti–racial-profiling guidelines that do three things:

* Put rules about what racial profiling is, or is not, into police department regulations all over California by early next year.
* Satisfy those who say new guidelines won’t be enough to prevent what they perceive as legal discrimination against them by mostly white men with badges.
* Quiet frustrated street cops who feel this sensitivity issue has gone too far and is making law enforcement tougher than it already was.

The most recent meeting was in San Diego in mid-June.

The regulations are coming from California’s Commission on Police Officer Standards and Training, the independent body of 15 gubernatorial appointees and the state attorney general. POST commissioners oversee the actions of 85,000 California officers in departments large and small. The racial-profiling guidelines being prepared by a task force are supposed to be on the books at police academies and police in-service training sessions by January 2002. And they’re not nearly ready to go.

“The biggest problem we have is that the definition of racial profiling is fuzzy, so the concept of how to deal with it also is a little fuzzy,” says POST public information officer Tom Hood. “Prejudice is touchy, and even trying to get a consensus is challenging, but we are, in good faith, operating under the assumption that [the guidelines] are necessary.”

“The public perception is that criminal profiling and racial profiling are the same,” says Clancy Faria, president of the Peace Officers Research Association of California (PORAC), the nation’s largest coalition of police officer associations. “They are not—criminal profiling is good and works; racial profiling is not good and should not be happening.” Faria says PORAC encouraged the guidelines as a way to train officers to be sensitive to racial profiling, but doesn’t think those guidelines should be used to target individual officers.

Conversations about racial profiling are conducted like carefully choreographed politically correct waltzes. Nobody wants to give the impression they’re not just thrilled with the prospect of defining on paper what respondents have told surveyors in cities like San Diego is happening on the streets.

The San Diego Police Department’s well-publicized survey (among the first in the nation) shows that people of color are, in fact, stopped more frequently than white drivers for even minor traffic violations, and it has become part of the Sacramento equation. How it’s being used to prepare the new guidelines is the subject of talk among officers who deny profiling exists—and among diversity advocates who insist it does.

“It’s important that the people coming up with the regulations make the distinction between the racial makeup of the driving population versus the racial makeup of the residential population, especially San Diego,” says Bill Farrar, president of the San Diego Police Officers Association. He says the number of Mexican drivers crossing into San Diego is a factor that may skew the numbers.

“But as long as the [anti–racial profiling] guidelines are reasonable and don’t substantially interfere with what we’re doing, we would have no problem with them,” Farrar says.

Community activists like San Diego’s Christian Ramirez are up front with their skepticism that any guidelines will work. “It’s a step, a small step, in the right direction,” says Ramirez, who heads the Raza Rights Coalition. “The approach is too little, too late. The only way to eradicate racial profiling is to make sure the community’s in control of police, that officers who work in areas like Shelltown and Barrio Logan also live there and know the people.”
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

More »Related Stories

Behind the Scenes Video: Making the May issue

Go behind the scenes of our beer issue to see how we get that perfectly frothy cover shot.

Palm Springs or Bust

The desert is calling with the upcoming Indian Wells Arts Festival and more

2015 Padres Spring Training: 9 Things Fans Should Know

Your guide to this season in Arizona, March 4 to April 3
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Most Popular

  1. Vote now: Best Restaurants 2015
    From best chefs to top tacos, you choose San Diego's best eats and drinks in 63 categories
  2. 27 Reasons to Love San Diego
    Our annual list of all things San Diego and rad—from kiteboarding to urban farming to a city-wide book club
  3. San Diego's Top 50 Trails
    From hiking the foothills to biking the beach, this is a city made for exploring outdoors. Here’s our latest, greatest checklist of trails we love—some in your own backyard
  4. 2015 Best of North County Party
    Sample, sip and party along with the best that North County has to offer at this signature event.
  5. I Tried It: The New Jazzercise
    When I hear the word “Jazzercise,” neon leotards, leg warmers, headbands, and old ladies come to mind
  6. Get Fit & Have Fun in San Diego
    From doggie bootcamps to intense bodybuilding programs, it’s an exciting time to get in shape. What are you waiting for?
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Promotions

Go Ahead... Ask McMillin!

At McMillin Realty, we are encouraging you to bring us your real estate questions. We will answer these questions….. for free.

La Jolla Music Society Events

The La Jolla Music Society's 2015 Calendar
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit Module

Connect With Us:

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Sponsored

'Tis The Season

Winter in the desert cities

100 Works of Art to See Before You Die in San Diego

Local art critics, museum directors, and the big kahunas of the art world picked their must-see paintings, sculptures, and buildings with a special checklist just for you
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags