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Tim Flannery, musicianComing Attractions

Tim Flannery's Still Got Something To Sing About

The popular Padres third-base coach’s musical instincts are as sharp as ever, even when he’s focused on the game. Tim Flannery wrote 10 songs for his new CD, Highway Song, while he was on the road with the team last season. He’ll debut the songs (and the CD) at an East County Performing Arts Center show on February 8.

Flannery says the new cuts are true to his roots—“a combination of Irish folk and Kentucky bluegrass,” including the use of a Celtic bazouski and Irish pipes to make the music. Flannery is calling the show his “medicine show,” because it’s meant to make everyone feel good.

“The style of music is similar to my last CD, but with more of an edge,” he says. His previous album was a reflective tribute to his late father, who died of Alzheimer’s disease. The newest music is “on the other side of healing. The music celebrates being alive,” he says.

For info, call 619-440-2277 or go to www.ecpac.com.

Filipino-American film The DebutA Film About Filipino-Americans Aims for the Mainstream

Gene Cajayon may be a first-time director, but he’s been pushing his movie about growing up Filipino-American for so long, he’s become a common voice on the other end of the phone to anyone in the film business who’ll listen. Since he couldn’t get anyone to distribute his movie (written with John Manal Castro), he and his growing army of supporters are doing it themselves. The Debut, in the works for seven years, arrives in San Diego theaters January 25.

Why has it taken so long? Cajayon says his relatively minuscule budget of $1 million and lack of white stars added up to zero interest from big-time film distributors. He doesn’t say this with bitterness. In fact, he just sounds excited he and his equally enthusiastic team are getting this movie into theaters on their own terms. Cajayon hopes to have a full month’s run here by squeezing The Debut into some big megaplexes that may have a screen or two available.

The teen-coming-of-age film should have a big audience here—San Diego County is home to the fourth-largest community of Filipinos and Filipino Americans in the nation, after New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. But Cajayon insists the story will ring true with audiences of all ethnicities.

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