Edit ModuleShow Tags

This Local Designer is Making San Diego Look Fabulous

Up next, Jules Wilson sets her stylish sights on the I.D.E.A. District and Belmont Park’s historic Plunge pool



Published:

Photo by Brady Architectural Photography

Jules Wilson

Jules Wilson knows her way around a fabric swatch and refuses to be intimidated by a 45-story high-rise. The interior designer has been in the business for 22 years, starting with yacht design and eventually graduating to residential and commercial. These days she’s focused on the hospitality and multifamily industries and spends time thinking about how to elevate style without sacrificing comfort.

“I’m drawn to simplicity and texture, but not necessarily austerity, and not cold, hard things,” says Wilson. “Right now the trend seems like it has to be rustic and industrial to be casual and comfortable. I’d like to see a more refined metropolitan design that’s still casual.”

The 43-year-old Little Italy resident finds inspiration from the art and design in places like Miami. “It’s design-y in a warm climate, like here,” she explains. “But it’s grittier, and I like that.”

For this Rancho Santa Fe home designed by local architects Taal Safdie and Ricardo Rabines, Wilson and her team used Italian designers like B&B Italia and Minotti and commissioned artists out of L.A. and Miami to dress the walls.

Even the everyday can spark an idea. On a recent trip to New York, she was fascinated by the different shapes of the city street grates, which led to a custom art installation at a project in Houston. She says, “I really feel like I am trying to differentiate myself by having brave, bold, and simple designs that don’t feel pretentious.”

At the Grey House apartment building in Houston, Wilson employed a fashion-as-art concept, inspired by the great Parisian fashion houses. | Photo by Tarick Foteh

Her portfolio is evidence of this design ethos. A few years ago, Wilson was charged with completing the interiors of a Rancho Santa Fe residence conceived by local architects Taal Safdie and Ricardo Rabines. Wilson oversaw the finishes, built-ins, and furnishings. She also commissioned much of the artwork, from L.A.- and Miami-based artists.

The Grey House apartments sit atop high-end retailers like Tom Ford and Dolce & Gabbana. | Photo by Tarick Foteh

In addition, she recently completed several multifamily high-rises built by the local development firm Oliver McMillan. Joining their successful projects in Houston and Honolulu is an urban apartment building in San Diego’s East Village called EV, whose entrance is located across from the NewSchool for Architecture and Design. Wilson’s inspiration for the building is summed up by an installation in the entryway that reads: “Home is where the art is.”

Looking forward, the designer has definite opinions on where the trends in hospitality and multifamily are headed. “The hotel world wants to feel more residential, and the multifamily industry wants to feel more like a hotel,” she explains.

This art installation at the EV Lofts in SD’s East Village is set on a wall of draft paper, inspired by the neighboring NewSchool of Architecture. | Photo by Brady Architectural Photography

Wilson is currently taking on Fit Plunge, a huge “very next-level” revamp of the Plunge pool building and its surrounds in Belmont Park. “It will be the coolest gym San Diego has seen yet,” she says proudly, describing the multiple levels of high-tech equipment and the open-air rooftop overlooking the Pacific.

The luxury Symphony Honolulu condos feature incredible ocean views and sleek Gaggenau appliances. Wilson says, “You feel like you are on vacation just living there.”

She’s also working with I.D.E.A. District co-founders David Malmuth and Pete Garcia on IDEA1, their first official project in the new downtown neighborhood. Its courtyard will be a hub that’s open to the public, hosting TED Talk–style speakers, concerts, gallery showings, and more.

“I just like working with clients that have a strong passion toward design,” she says. But of course, when you’re a designer, it all comes down to looks—and if left to Wilson’s devices, San Diego’s future is looking fabulous.

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

More »Related Stories

Inside the Icon: Lifeguard Tower 5C

It has one of the best views in San Diego—and has been crucial to lifesaving in Coronado for over 80 years

Letter from the Editor: All About That (Sea) Bass

Editor in Chief Erin Meanley Glenny dishes on the June issue of San Diego Magazine

Meet the Players of San Diego's New Rugby Team

7 Legion players on their favorite things about San Diego, and why rugby is better than football
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Most Popular

  1. Vote Now for San Diego's Best Restaurants 2018
    From burritos to bottomless mimosas, you choose San Diego’s best eats and drinks in 90 categories
  2. Personal Stories are on Display at the Museum of Man's 'PostSecret'
    Frank Warren collects deep, dark secrets for this community arts project
  3. The Best Burgers in San Diego
    These burgers are food critic Troy Johnson's finalists for the best in San Diego
  4. The Best of North County 2018
    Our annual list of what we’re loving above the 56, from bites and brews to shopping, wellness, and arts and kids’ activities galore
  5. 31 Best Places to Live in San Diego
    Five local homeowners share their advice, tips, and tricks on how they sealed the deal
  6. Has Anything Really Changed Since Ballast Point Sold to Constellation?
    More than two years after the acquisition, misinformation and misunderstanding still abound
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Promotions

Vote Now for Your Orangetheory Winner!

Winners will be announced at our Sweat event on May 12

Go Ahead... Ask McMillin!

At McMillin Realty, we are encouraging you to bring us your real estate questions. We will answer these questions….. for free.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit Module

Connect With Us:

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Sponsored

AquaVie: 10 Reasons It’s Downtown’s Best Kept Secret

The best workout and spa getaway around? It’s actually right underneath your nose.

Enter a Drawing You Could Actually Win

There are more than 1,700 prizes in the Dream House Raffle
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags